Situated at the coast four kilometers West of the Strymona delta, the ancient city of Argilos occupies a hill called « Palaiokastro ». The hill, culminating in an acropolis at an altitude of 80 m. high, is naturally protected by ravines on its West and North sides, while its Southeastern side gently slopes down towards the sea. The site of Argilos was first recognized by P. Perdrizet in 1883, basing his identification on the writings of Herodotus, who says that when the Persians crossed the Strymona on their way towards Athens which they wished to conquer, the first city they encountered was Argilos. The site was revisited by P. Collart and P. Devambez in 1930, but no excavation took place. At the end of the 70′s, a few tombs belonging to the necropolis of Argilos were uncovered by the Greek archaeological service. Systematic research only began in 1992 by a joint Greek-Canadian team.

General view of the site and Acropolis

General view of the site and Acropolis

 

General view of the site and Acropolis
The Greek-Canadian archaeological mission at Argilos is a vast collaboration project between the Ephoria of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities of Kavala and the University of Montreal. Under the direction of Zisis Bonias and Jacques Perreault, the mission numbers more then 20 students from various Canadian and European universities participating in the excavations every year, with assistance of qualified workers and scholars specialized in various areas of greek archaeology (architecture, pottery, numimatics, etc.). The results are brought to the atttention of a wider public by articles in greek and foreign scientific periodicals and by lectures given yearly in Europe and Canada.

Aerial view of the southeast sector

Aerial view of the southeast sector

Aerial view of the seaside sector

Aerial view of the seaside sector